2015 Schedule

Participants will spend the first week (June 22-28, 2015) at the University of Massachusetts Amherst campus, and then reconvene the following summer at UCLA for a three-day symposium (June 20-23, 2016).

2015 UMass Amherst Session Summary (June 22-28, 2015)

Sunday, June 21: Participants arrive
Monday, June 22: Focus on Dangerous Embodiments and challenges inherent with visualizations of sites with ‘difficult heritage’
Tuesday, June 23: The veracity of the computer model and the value of metadata (morning session), and the interdisciplinary scholar as end user (afternoon)
Wednesday, June 24: Scholarly communication and the academic research agenda
Thursday, June 25: Specific challenges of creating 3D content for teaching and learning
Friday, June 26: The dangers of representation
Saturday, June 27: Veracity of avatar gestures and clothing
Sunday, June 28: Concluding session

Detailed Description

2015 UMass Amherst Session (June 22-28, 2015)

Scholars arrive June 21, 2014. Institute participants will meet in the Integrative Learning Center on the University of Massachusetts campus. The UMass Amherst session will be organized with lecture and discussion in the morning, followed by hands-on case study work in the afternoon. Each lecturer will focus on a problem as it relates to his/her own model. As such, only general themes will be included for each lecturer in the schedule below.

Monday, June 22, 2015

Morning location: Integrative Learning Center (ILC) S140
9 a.m.: Welcome and brief comments by Alyson A. Gill and Lisa M. Snyder.
Evaluation questionnaire
Participant introductions

THEME: Dangerous Embodiments
9:30-11:00 Participant introductions
Names, affiliations, and connection to 3D work and/or ongoing projects in four (4) minutes or less per participant.

Break (15 minutes)

11:15-12:30 DANGEROUS EMBODIMENTS
Lecturer: Dr. Ruth Hawkins, Director, Heritage Sites, Arkansas State University
Presentation on two ASU Heritage Sites with difficult histories: the Lakeport Plantation and the Rohwer Japanese-American Internment Camp.
Presentation and Q & A about ASU Heritage Sites and problems of 3D reconstructions of sites with difficult histories

12:30-1:30 LUNCH
Participants will be given $10 coupons good at any of the food venues in the Blue Wall dining facility in the Lincoln Campus Center. Options include Harvest, Famous Famiglia Pizza, Yum! Bakery, Green Fields, Tamales (Mexican food), Wasabi (sushi), Deli Delish, The Grill, Chef’s Table, and Star Ginger (Vietnamese, Thai, and Asian Specialties)

Afternoon location: ILC N111 (1 p.m. – 5 p.m.)
1:30-1:45 Lab introduction
1:45-3:00 Hands-on session
Scholars will move into the lab and use the Unity model of the Lakeport Plantation as a case study to frame this discussion. Scholars will also play through the Drama in the Delta game and discuss the avatar of Jane, the teenage girl that players use as an avatar when playing the game. The Drama in the Delta game, supported by two NEH Digital Humanities Start-Up grants puts the player in the role of Jane, a young girl interned at the Jerome Japanese-American Internment Camp.

Break (15 minutes)

3:15-4:15 Panel and participant discussion on Dangerous Embodiments (Ruth, Angel, Alyson)
Panel discussion led by Gill, Snyder, and Angel Nieves.
Scholars of ‘difficult heritage’ are often confronted with the challenge of producing meaningful engagements with diverse audiences through the use of new digital technologies. With this engagement we often face risks as we represent serious, often painful and controversial, historical content through a medium so closely aligned with popular entertainment. This discussion will begin with questions about the ethics of avatar creation and why there is a need to consider the impact of avatars within virtual environments, and will touch on analogue examples of embodiment in living history contexts. As humanists, we are challenged to question the impact of these embodiments, and to consider not only the ethics of character creation, but also the ways in which those characters impact the narratives that viewers take from them.

4:15-4:45 Possible participant presentations

4:45-5:00 Closing comments

6:00-7:00 DINNER
A catered dinner will be provided in the ILC. On the menu: an Italian-themed buffet that includes salad, minestrone soup, vegetarian lasagna, baked ziti, chicken parmesan, broccoli with tomatoes, ratatouille, tiramisu, and cannoli. (All meals include vegan options.)

Evening Session (7:00-8:30 p.m.)
Professor Erik Champion will join the Institute from Perth, Australia, for an evening remote session. There will not be a hands-on component for this lecturer.

Tuesday, June 23, 2015

Morning location: ILC S140
THEMES: The veracity of the model and the value of metadata, and the interdisciplinary scholar as end-user
9-9:15
Morning welcome
9:15 a.m. – 10:45 a.m. Morning Session
Center for Educational Software Development (CESD), University of Massachusetts, Amherst
Discussion of work done by the CESD and time for participants to complete initial index cards on planned research (these are first drafts to be firmed up by the end of the week). Time slots to be discussed.

Break (15 minutes)

11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. The interdisciplinary scholar as end-user
Lecturer: Professor John R. Clarke, University of Texas, Austin; Presentation on the Oplontis Project, a project partially supported through a Collaborative Research Grant from the NEH.
The mission of the Oplontis Project is to conduct a systematic, multidisciplinary study of Villa A and Villa B at Oplontis. Publication will be “born digital” within the Humanities E-Book Series of the American Council of Learned Societies. This collaborative project has interdisciplinary scholars as the end-users. As such, the audience is different than other projects that we have seen.

12:30-1:30 LUNCH
A catered lunch will be provided in the ILC. On the menu: build your own sandwich platters, potato salad, baby kale salad, beverages, assorted bars and brownies.

Afternoon location: ILC N111

1:30-2:30 Hands-on session
Scholars will move into the lab and use specific models as case studies to frame this discussion.

2:30-3:00 Q & A with John R. Clarke

Break (15 minutes)

3:15-4:30 Participant discussion on the day’s topics

4:30-5:00 Participant presentations

6:15-? Optional no-host bar at the Lord Jeffery (rooftop terrace–enter through restaurant)

Wednesday, June 24, 2015

THEMES: Scholarly communication and the academic research agenda, and the creator as end user
(Note: On this day we will have two lecturers.)

9 a.m. – 12 p.m. Morning Session

9:15-10:45 Scholarly communication and the academic research agenda, and the creator as end user (Chris Johanson; to be recorded)
Lecturer: Professor Chris Johanson, University of California, Los Angeles; Presentation on the application of digital tools and techniques to social historical research questions from classical antiquity.
Arguing that the strength of a digital reconstruction is its “inherent ability to enable hypothesis testing, visual argumentation, and refutability,” Johanson will challenge assumptions about cultural heritage visualizations that give primacy to visual fidelity and a fixed final product. When used in service to the production of knowledge and scholarly communication, 3D models can bend representational boundaries and provide researchers opportunities to explore ideas and new modes of scholarship.
Lecturer: Professor Arne R. Flaten, Coastal Carolina University; Presentation on the 3D model and pedagogical practice.
Flaten will discuss the ways in which the constructivist approach functions within the Ashes2Art pedagogical framework.

Break (15 minutes)

11:00-12:30 the 3D model and pedagogical practice (Arne R. Flaten; to be recorded)

12:30-1:30 LUNCH
A catered lunch will be provided in the ILC. On the menu: an assortment of pizzas (house special, cheese, primavera, and pepperoni), Mediterranean salad, beverages, and assorted cookies.

Afternoon location: ILC N111

1:30-2:30 Hands-on session

2:30-3:00 Q & A with Chris Johanson and Arne R. Flaten

Break (15 minutes)

3:15-4:30 Participant discussion on the day’s topics

4:30-5:00 Participant presentations

DINNER AND EVENING FREE (Note: We will be asking if people want to meet for dinner at the Monkey Bar and Grill at 6:30 p.m.)

Thursday, June 25, 2015

THEME: Project requirements for broad public dissemination
(Note: On this day we will have two lecturers.)

9 a.m. – 12 p.m. Morning Session

9-9:15 Morning welcome

9:15-11:00 Lecturer: Dr. Lisa M. Snyder, University of California, Los Angeles; Presentation on the specific challenges of creating 3D content for teaching and learning featuring VSim and the UCLA model of the World’s Columbian Exposition of 1893.
Large-scale integration of virtual environments into classrooms across disciplines and grade levels will depend upon the development of appropriate content and delivery mechanisms that meet the needs in-service educators and accommodate the changing expectations of learners. Focusing on this specific cohort of end users, discussion topics will include students’ preferences for information-rich environments and instructional technology design emphasizing educator Larry Cuban’s triad of simplicity, versatility and efficiency.

Break (15 minutes)

11:15-12:30 PUBLIC USE OF INTERACTIVE 3D RECONSTRUCTIONS
Lecturer: Lisa Fischer, Director of Colonial Williamsburg’s Digital History Center: Digital approaches for revolutionizing the user experience at cultural heritage sites.

12:30-1:30 lunch break
Participants will be given $10 coupons good at any of the food venues in the Blue Wall dining facility in the Lincoln Campus Center.

Afternoon location: ILC N111

1:30-2:15 VSim tutorial for content creators

2:15-3:00 Participant discussion on VSim

Break (15 minutes)

3:00-4:30 Hands on Colonial Williamsburg

4:30-5:00 Participant presentations

DINNER AND EVENING FREE

Friday, June 26, 2015

THEME: The dangers of representation
9 a.m. – 12 p.m. Morning Session

9-9:15 Morning welcome
Lecturer: Professor Diane Favro, University of California, Los Angeles; Presentation on Rome Reborn and Digital Karnak
Discussion of representational issues with participants, using Rome Reborn and Digital Karnak to illustrate representational challenges.

9:15-10:45 THE DANGERS OF REPRESENTATION (Diane Favro; to be recorded)

Break (15 minutes)

11:00-12:30 Discussion of academic process as it relates to 3D content

12:30-1:30 LUNCH
A catered lunch will be provided in the ILC. On the menu: boxed sandwich lunches, your choice of turkey, ham, tuna, veggie, and caprese. Each lunch includes a sandwich, hand fruit, all natural chips, water, and a cookie.

Afternoon location: ILC N111

1:30-2:15 Hands-on session and discussion about City Engine/Rome and Q & A with Diane Favro

2:15-3:00 Presentation of Digital Karnak and VSim tutorial for users

Break (15 minutes)

3:15-4:30 Participant discussion on key challenges and issues facilitated by Fred Zinn, Associate Director, Academic Computing, UMass Amherst

4:30-5:00 Participant presentations

DINNER AND EVENING FREE
6:00-? Optional social outing: Lady Bea River Cruise … 6 pm departure for 7 pm cruise … $15 per person

Saturday, June 27, 2015

THEME: Veracity of avatar gestures and clothing in the model

Morning location: ILC S140

9-9:15 Morning welcome

9:15-10:45 USING VIRTUAL WORLDS TO TEST SOLAR ALIGNMENTS (Skype with Bernie Frischer; to be recorded) Lecturer: Dr. Bernie Frischer, Professor of Informatics in the School of Informatics and Computing at Indiana University; Presentation on Digital Hadrian’s Villa Project by videoconference.

Break (15 minutes)

11:00-12:30 Initial discussion of research topics and reminder of the Institute vision

12:30-1:30 LUNCH
Participants will be given $10 coupons good at any of the food venues in the Blue Wall dining facility in the Lincoln Campus Center.

Afternoon location: ILC N111

1:30-2:30 Hands-on session

2:30-3:00 Discussion

Break (15 minutes)

3:15-4:30 Participant discussion on the day’s topics

4:30-5:00 Final participant presentations

Break (1 hour)

Sunday, June 28, 2015

9 a.m. – 12 p.m. Morning Session only

Morning location: ILC S140

9-9:15 Final morning welcome

9:15-9:30 Evaluation forms and concluding paperwork

9:30-10:15 Final assignment of research topics and reminder of the Institute vision

Break (15 minutes)

10:30-11:00 Concluding comments from the participants (to be recorded)

11:00-12:00 Concluding remarks and final discussion

Taking stock and next steps.

Scholars depart in p.m. All transfers provided to Bradley International Airport.

INTERIM PERIOD

After the first session, scholars will return to their home institutions and work on their projects, posting weekly (or more frequent) updates on the discussion board. This board will be moderated by Gill and Snyder, with lecturers commenting as needed.

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